LCO vs. LOC Method: Which One is Best for Your Hair Type?

LCO vs. LOC Method: Which One is Best for Your Hair Type?

LCO vs. LOC Method: Which One is Best for Your Hair Type?

Keywords/keyphrases: LOC Method, LCO Method, Locking in Moisture, Low Porosity 

Locking moisture into natural hair is an endless battle for novice naturalistas and natural hair mavens alike. No matter how much you think, you do or do not understand about hydrating your hair, achieving perfection can seem impossible.

It is for this reason that natural hair care enthusiasts everywhere tout the L.O.C and L.C.O methods as being extremely useful for locking in moisture –but the question remains, which method is best for your hair type?

Let’s answer this question by first examining the L.C.O vs. L.O.C.

 

Image Source: Bigstock/Olly2

 

What is the LCO Method?

The LCO or Liquid Cream Oil Method follows the sequence of applying liquid, cream or oil to your hair. Naturalistas use this method to gain control over problems such as frizz and dryness. Even if you are new to the game of natural hair, you already understand that kinky, coily and curly hair have a difficult time with sustaining moisture.

The LCO method caters to natural hair with proper application. It penetrates the hair shaft and helps to repair the structure of hair while also sealing in much-needed moisture. The order in which product application takes place lends is particularly useful if you are dealing with high porosity hair. The LCO approach can weigh hair down or leave it feeling greasy.

Natural hair experts identify the LCO method as being best for women of every hair texture including those with relaxed hair but find it to be especially useful for the following:

  • Type 4 hair (a, b)
  • Fine/medium hair
  • Normal or High porosity

 

What is the LOC Method?

The LOC or Liquid Oil Cream Method follows the sequence of applying a liquid, oil, and cream to your hair.  Natural hair experts identify the LOC method as being best for women of various hair textures including those with relaxed hair, but many agree that this method is especially useful for the following:

  • Type 4 hair (a, b, c)
  • Thin/fine hair
  • All porosity levels

Unlike the LCO method, low porosity hair fairs a little bit better with the LOC process. However, you still have to proceed with caution in your oil and cream selections. For example, low porosity hair will benefit most from the use of a lighter oil than coconut or Jamaican Castor Oil solution because it is easy to overload low porosity hair with creams and oils if you are not careful.  

When applying the LOC method, you'll want to use oil as a sealant. For instance, to keep your hair hydrated with moisture retention, try our Bantu Coils Pure Marula Oil for hydration and nourishment or double down with hydration and replenishment using our Leave-In Conditioner and Growth Oil with Pure Marula Oil and Rooibos Tea Complex.

 

Which Moisture Locking Method is Best for Your Hair?

The natural hair community identifies hair porosity as being a component for choosing one method over another. Although both methods work well for normal or high porosity hair, low porosity hair thrives with use of the LOC method.  

Image Source: Bigstock/NeonShot

 

Both methods are aiming for the same outcome –that goal being to ensure that your hair does not fall victim to a particular season or experience moisture loss. They both serve to reduce the risk for the unwanted side effects of dry hair such as frizz, loss of elasticity or breakage.  

Don’t be afraid to test these methods out to determine which option works best for your natural tresses!

 

 

  

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